PBS Kids Wiki
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Hey there! Long ago, I had an idea coming out of my mind. This blog post is about the PBS Kids channels from all over the world.

History

Introduced on September 6, 1999, PBS Kids was PBS' successful children's brand in the United States. Because of this, PBS Kids Worldwide Inc., a newly-formed division of PBS Networks International, launched international versions of the PBS Kids channel as pay TV channels. The pan-European feed was launched on October 1, 1999, broadcasting to Europe, Middle East, Turkey, and Africa, with English being the link language. Five days later, additional audio tracks in Spanish, French, German, Dutch, Italian, Swedish, Norwegian and Danish were added.

Starting in 2000, the PBS Kids brand began expanding to Latin America and Asia Pacific. A separated British feed of PBS Kids was launched on January 1, 2000, making it the first feed to be separated from the pan-European feed. On February 10 that year, the channel was launched in Latin America. This version is divided into five feeds; four (North, Central, South and Pacific) are in Spanish, and one in Brazil is in Portuguese. Both feeds are also in English via SAP.

Separate feeds for Spain, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Italy, Scandinavia (Sweden, Norway and Denmark), Poland (first era), and Turkey were created, completely replacing the pan-European feed.

Five days later, after the channel's Nordic launch in Sweden, Norway and Denmark, PBS Kids was launched in Finland and Iceland on September 15, 2000. Finland received the feed in English and Swedish, while Iceland received it in English and Danish.

When PBS Kids was launched in India on October 6, 2000, the channel only received an English audio track. On April 4, 2005, a Hindi audio track was added, followed by the Tamil and Telugu audio tracks on August 6, 2007.

Before the CEE feeds of the channel, Hungary, Romania, Moldova and Russia received the first-era Polish feed on January 1, 2001, broadcasting in Polish, Hungarian, Romanian, Russian and English. On July 1, 2002, the Czech Republic, Slovakia and Bulgaria also received the same feed, adding the Czech and Bulgarian audio tracks next to the other five.

When PBS Kids came to Portugal on July 9, 2001, it received the Spanish feed, broadcasting in Spanish, Portuguese and English, similar to the Latin American version. It wouldn't be until September 5, 2005 when a localized Portuguese feed was created, replacing the Spanish feed.

On February 18, 2003, the Arabic feed of PBS Kids was launched for the Arabic-speaking markets of the Middle East. This is the only EMEA feed that is free-to-air and not to broadcast in English.

Two separate CEE feeds - one (Central Europe) specifically for Poland (until September 1, 2008) Hungary, the Czech Republic and Slovakia, and another (Eastern Europe) for Romania, Russia (until September 1, 2008) and Bulgaria - were launched, replacing the first-era Polish feed on August 1, 2005.

On November 29, 2005, PBS Networks EMEA announced that PBS Kids would launch two German-language feeds for Austria and Switzerland. These feeds were launched on January 16, 2006, replacing the main German feed that was broadcasting exclusively to Germany at the time.

On September 1, 2008, two localized feeds were created for Poland and Russia, both respectively replacing the Central and Eastern European feeds.

On July 21, 2009, the Balkan feed was created for Serbia, Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro and North Macedonia. At the time, this feed broadcast Serbian, Croatian and English.

On August 1, 2010, the Eastern European feed added an Ukrainian audio track when the channel began broadcasting in Ukraine, but closed down on July 2014 for unknown reasons. On August 1, 2011, the Balkan feed added a Slovene audio track when the channel (along with Minimax) began broadcasting in Slovenia.

On October 7, 2013, the American programming block of PBS Kids received a major rebrand by Primal Screen. With this case, Dash was replaced by twins Dee and Del, though Dash remains in the 2008 logo. The Dot logo was also retired, however, Dot remains as a mascot. The same went for Canada, when the rebrand occured over there on October 18 that year.

During November 2013, international PBS Kids channels received the same rebrand, but with a different logo style (which is based off the 1999 logo), with Western Europe being the first continent to receive the rebrand. Unlike the American and Canadian counterparts, Dash was never dropped out.

On May 12, 2014, PBS Networks EMEA announced that PBS Kids would launch a Belgian feed. This feed was launched on June 9 that year, replacing the Dutch feed in Flanders (the Dutch-speaking parts of Belgium) and the French feed in Wallonia (the French-speaking parts).

On December 10, 2015, PBS Networks EMEA announced that the Austrian and (the German-speaking) Swiss feeds of PBS Kids would no longer be broadcast due to unknown reasons. The Austrian and Swiss feeds closed down on December 31 at 10:00 PM (22:00) that year, and were replaced by the main German feed the next day at 6:00 AM (06:00).

The pan-European feed was still broadcast in the English-speaking parts of the Middle East and Africa. On December 31, 2018, this feed, along with the Arabic, French and Portuguese feeds were removed in the Middle East and Africa.

On June 30, 2019, due to low ratings, the Belgian feed shut down at 10:00 PM (22:00). The next day on July 1 at 6:00 AM (06:00), the Dutch and French feeds were relaunched in Flanders and Wallonia, respectively.

Launched

  • January 1, 2000 - United Kingdom (separated from the pan-European feed)
  • February 10, 2000 - Latin America (Mexico, Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Venezuela, Peru, Bolivia, Ecuador, Uruguay, Paraguay, Panama, Central America, the Caribbean and Brazil)
  • March 9, 2000 - Australia and New Zealand (first era)
  • April 15, 2000 - Singapore, Malaysia (my country), Brunei, the Philippines, Indonesia, South Korea (broadcasting the Southeast Asian feed with Korean subtitles), Vietnam, Thailand and Hong Kong
  • April 19, 2000 - Japan
  • April 23, 2000 - Taiwan
  • May 1, 2000 - Poland (separated from the pan-European feed)
  • July 3, 2000 - Germany, Austria and the German-speaking parts of Switzerland (separated from the pan-European feed)
  • July 7, 2000 - Netherlands and the Dutch-speaking parts of Belgium (Flanders) (separated from the pan-European feed)
  • July 12, 2000 - France, the French-speaking parts of Belgium (Wallonia), Switzerland and Africa (separated from the pan-European feed)
  • July 17, 2000 - Italy and the Italian-speaking parts of Switzerland (separated from the pan-European feed)
  • August 24, 2000 - Turkey
  • September 10, 2000 - Sweden, Norway and Denmark (separated from the pan-European feed)
  • September 15, 2000 - Finland and Iceland (broadcasting the Nordic feed, with the former broadcasting in English and Swedish, and the latter broadcasting in English and Danish)
  • October 6, 2000 - India
  • November 6, 2000 - Spain (separated from the pan-European feed)
  • November 19, 2000 - Greece
  • January 1, 2001 - Hungary, Romania, Moldova and Russia (broadcasting the first-era Polish feed)
  • July 9, 2001 - Portugal (broadcasting the Spanish feed with local advertisements)
  • July 1, 2002 - Czech Republic, Slovakia and Bulgaria (broadcasting the first-era Polish feed)
  • February 18, 2003 - Middle East (Arabic version, under the name PBS Kids Arabia)
  • July 1, 2003 - Israel
  • June 1, 2004 - Pakistan
  • May 17, 2005 - South Korea (separated from the Southeast Asian feed)
  • May 1, 2006 - Ireland (broadcasting the British feed with local advertisements)
  • August 1, 2005 - Central and Eastern Europe (two separate feeds, replacing the first-era Polish feed)
  • September 5, 2005 - Portugal (becoming an independent feed) and the Portuguese-speaking parts of Africa
  • November 6, 2005 - Canada (English version)
  • January 16, 2006 - Austria (under the name PBS Kids Austria) and the German-speaking parts of Switzerland (under the name PBS Kids Schweiz) (replacing the German feed)
  • March 8, 2006 - Canada (French version, under the name PBS Kids en Français)
  • September 1, 2008 - Poland (second era) and Russia (localized feed) (both respectively replacing the Central and Eastern European feeds)
  • July 21, 2009 - Serbia, Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro and North Macedonia
  • August 1, 2010 - Ukraine (broadcasting the Eastern European feed)
  • August 1, 2011 - Slovenia (broadcasting the Balkan feed)
  • June 9, 2014 - Belgium (localized feed, replacing the Dutch feed in Flanders and the French feed in Wallonia)

Closed

  • July 31, 2005 - Poland (first era) (replaced by the Central European feed)
  • March 1, 2010 - Canada (French version)
  • July 6, 2014 - Ukraine (Eastern European feed)
  • December 31, 2015 - Austria and the German-speaking parts of Switzerland (replacing two local feeds with the German feed)
  • December 31, 2018 - Middle East and Africa (pan-European feed, along with the Arabic, French, and Portuguese feeds)
  • June 30, 2019 - Belgium (replacing the localized feed with the Dutch feed in Flanders and the French feed in Wallonia)
  • December 31, 2020 - Australia and New Zealand (first era)

Dates for continents/countries where the channels adopted the 2013 global rebrand

  • October 18, 2013 - Canada (English version) (using the 2008 Dash logo that was introduced over there back in 2010)
  • November 3, 2013 - Western Europe (United Kingdom, Ireland, Spain, Portugal, Italy, France, the Netherlands, Germany, Austria, Switzerland, and Belgium/Flanders/Wallonia), Middle East, Israel, Turkey, and Africa
  • November 6, 2013 - Central Europe (Poland, Hungary, the Czech Republic, and Slovakia), Eastern Europe (Romania, Moldova, Russia, Bulgaria, and Ukraine), and ex-Yugoslavia (Serbia, Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, North Macedonia, and Slovenia)
  • November 9, 2013 - Scandinavia (Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Finland and Iceland)
  • November 12, 2013 - Greece and Cyprus
  • November 15, 2013 - Asia Pacific (excluding China, Japan, and South Korea)
  • November 18, 2013 - Japan and South Korea
  • November 21, 2013 - Mexico, Colombia, Venezuela, Central America, and the Caribbean
  • November 24, 2013 - Argentina, Paraguay, Uruguay, Chile, Peru, Bolivia, and Ecuador
  • November 27, 2013 - Brazil

Feeds

Latin America

  • North feed - Broadcasting exclusively to Mexico. It uses the Mexico City timezone (UTC-5).
  • Central feed - Broadcasting to Colombia, Venezuela, Central America and the Caribbean. It uses the Bogota timezone (UTC-5/-4 DST).
  • South feed - Broadcasting to Argentina, Paraguay and Uruguay. It uses the Buenos Aires timezone (UTC-3).
  • Pacific feed - Broadcasting to Chile, Peru, Bolivia and Ecuador. It uses the Santiago timezone (UTC-3/-2 DST).
  • Brazil feed - Broadcasting exclusively to Brazil. Broadcasting in Portuguese, it uses the Brasilia timezone (UTC-3).

Balkans, Central and Eastern Europe

  • Central European feed - Available in Hungary, the Czech Republic and Slovakia. It broadcasts in English, Hungarian and Czech. Until September 1, 2008, this feed was available in Poland and broadcast in Polish.
  • Eastern European feed - Available in Romania, Moldova and Bulgaria. It broadcasts in English, Romanian and Bulgarian. Until September 1, 2008, this feed was available in Russia and broadcast in Russia. This feed was also available in Ukraine and broadcast in Ukrainian from August 1, 2010 to July 6, 2014.
  • Balkan feed - Available in Serbia, Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, North Macedonia and Slovenia. It broadcasts in English, Serbian, Croatian and Slovene.

Logos

Trivia

  • In real life, PBS Kids only expanded to Africa and Australia between 2019 and 2021.
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